PlayTime: Seasonality of the toys and games TV market

Generation Media takes a look at how TV ads for toys between January and April have changed year-on-year...
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As a percentage of all TV advertising seen by children, Toys & Games enjoyed a 1.3 percentile point increase in Jan-April 2012 vs 2011 and a 2.5 percentile point increase vs 2010.

March 2012 has shown the largest YOY difference, with Toys & Games representing 11.1 per cent of all TV advertising seen by children in 2012 compared to 7.7 per cent in March 2011, due to a 29 per cent YOY increase in no. of campaigns on air vs 2011 (96 vs 124).

Conversely more campaigns were on air in April 2011 compared to the same month in 2012 (171 vs 165) perhaps a resultant factor of the Royal Wedding in April 2011.

Although the number of campaigns decreased YOY, the level of CH Eq. TVRs per campaign increased from 69 to 77.

Campaigns such as Innovation’s HexBug (370 CH Eq. TVRs) Hasbro’s Battle Ships (328 CH Eq. TVRs) and Panini’s Adrenalyn Euro campaign (308 CH Eq. TVRs) drove the market in April 2012.

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