How to ensure your toy's launch isn't a failure

ToyNews' Inside Trader Steve Reece explains what firms can do to reduce risk.
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With more and more new toys hitting shelves, it’s increasingly important for suppliers to reduce the risk of a product launch failure.

On average, somewhere between two-thirds to three-quarters of all SKUs in the market each year are new. Because of this, a bad 12-month period doesn’t need to stand in the way of a good 12 months next year. 

Nevertheless, it’s important to acknowledge the risks with new product launches.

With a new hero range launch costing hundreds of thousands of pounds (or more for global launches), it seems imprudent to just accept that some products will work and others won’t.

Toy companies which experience lasting success tend to be experts at reducing the risk of product launch failure. 

Read the full article to find out more.

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