Billboard to move into toys and games

Music brand has teamed with licensing firm CPLG to secure partners in the toy space.
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Music brand has teamed with licensing firm CPLG to secure partners in the toy space.

Music brand Billboard has appointed CPLG to represent the brand’s licensing initiatives for products and retail across Europe, the Middle East and Africa.

The partnership aims to 'to amplify an already extensive international portfolio of consumer product categories'.

The licensing agreement will include see the brand look to move into areas including toys and games.

“Working with CPLG will allow Billboard to not only further expand our branded consumer products and retail initiatives into new territories, but also accelerate our international growth with a known industry leader,” said Francisco Arenas, senior vice president, business development and licensing, Billboard and The Hollywood Reporter.

“With our aggressive expansion agenda into new businesses, CPLG will complement our strategy with local knowledge, which will allow us to partner with best-in-class licensees and retailers in the region.”

Steve Manners, executive vice president, CPLG, added: “This impressive partnership will introduce a new audience to Billboard and allow the global music brand to connect with their loyal followers through the launch of consumer products in these markets."



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