Tests find that fidget spinners pose serious injury risk

A study by BBC1’s Watchdogs has revealed that serious health risks are posed by poor-quality, imported fidget spinners.

A sample of spinners found that the products had edges sharp enough to puncture skin and even eyes and failed basic toy safety checks.

Many of these bootlegged products are being sold through unofficial channels such as market stalls and car-boot sales, but several were also found in local shops and on eBay.

eBay released a statement addressing the controversy, saying: “These items are absolutely not permitted and will be immediately removed. We’d like to thank the programme for bringing these items to our attention.”

National trading standards officials have advised parents to look for the CE mark on packaging, which means items have been tested to European standards. The officials also urged to buy the toys from a reputable seller and never for children under three as spinners contain small parts that could present a choking hazard.

About Robert Hutchins

Robert Hutchins is the editor of Licensing.biz and ToyNews. Hutchins has worked his way up from Staff Writer to the position of Editor across the two titles, having spent almost eight years with both ToyNews and Licensing.biz, and what now seems like a lifetime surrounded by toys. You can contact him by emailing robert.hutchins@biz-media.co.uk or calling him on 0203 143 8780 You can even follow him on Twitter @RobGHutchins if ranting is your thing...

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