A draft of the Investigatory Powers Bill states that internet providers would have a legal duty to assist in the hacking of devices, including manufacturers working with smart toys.

Smart toys could be used by security services to spy on suspects

MPs have been told that smart toys could be used by the security services to spy on suspects.

A draft of the Investigatory Powers Bill states that internet providers would have a legal duty to assist in the hacking of devices, including manufacturers working with smart toys, as well as phones and PCs.

BBC News reports that Antony Walker, of techUK, told MPs that anything that connected to the internet could be hacked into.

"A range of devices that have been in the news recently, in relation to a hack, are children’s toys, that children can interact with," Walker told the Commons science and technology committee.

"These are devices that may sit in a child’s bedroom but are accessible. In theory, the manufacturer of those products could be the subject of a warrant to enable equipment interference with those devices.

"So the potential extent, I think, is something that needs to be carefully considered."

Walker added that the Home Office needed to be clearer on where it draws the line over what it calls ‘equipment interference’.

About Robert Hutchins

Robert Hutchins is the editor of ToyNews and its sister title, Licensing.biz. He has worked his way from Staff Writer to Editor across the two titles, having spent almost eight years with both and what now seems like a lifetime surrounded by toys. You can contact him by emailing robert.hutchins@biz-media.co.uk or calling him on 0203 143 8780 You can even follow him on Twitter @RobGHutchins if ranting is your thing...

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