Generation Media on Frozen, ABC results and the stability of the children's press market

February 15th 2016 at 1:04PM
UPDATED February 16th 2016 at 12:30PM
Generation Media on Frozen, ABC results and the stability of the children's press market

Generation Media's Ellie Start talks us through the latest ABCs and what the current strength of the kids' press means for big name brands like Frozen.

A big day for publishers and media agencies alike, Thursday (11th February ’16) saw the final ABC Consumer Magazine report release for 2015, revealing the updated circulations from July-December ‘15.

While 63 per cent of kids' titles experienced a decline, the children's magazines catagory on the whole has grown by 31 per cent year-on-year, proving that it is still one of the few press sectors to have managed to sustain its relevance in a digital world.

The sector demonstrating the biggest growth was Primary Boys, with magazines such as Toxic (+3.9 per cent YoY) and LEGO Ninjago (+10.5 per cent) still proving popular. Off the back of the Star Wars film release, three new Star Wars titles were also launched, culminating in a total 21.7 per cent year on year increase for boys titles. While Ninjago remains the top Boys press property, with LEGO titles now restricting advertising to only LEGO products, we can expect to see advertisers turn to other titles to reach the primary boys audience.

Pre-school remains the largest kids' press sector, with these titles accounting for 44 per cent share of the total children's press market. Peppa Pig remains untouchable accounting for the top two pre-school titles, with Fun to Learn Peppa Pig remaining the most sought after pre-school title for the fourth consecutive year. CBeebies Art has recovered from last year’s seven per cent decline, demonstrating a 16.6 per cent year on year growth.

So what was the largest kids' title for 2015? It may not come as a surprise to see it was Disney’s Frozen. The licence’s popularity shows no sign of slowing down two years after the film’s release with circulation growth of 8.8 per cent. It appears Elsa is also distracting girls from their other female idols, with Disney Princess magazine and Barbie experiencing 21.6 per cent and 25.5 per cent declines respectively.

In recent months there has been talk among publishers and in the press regarding parents' concern over the amount of time children are spending with their various screens. Could the stability of the kids press market be a reflection of parents turning to a trusted environment?

With kids press still withstanding the dramatic declines observed across the rest of the press market, we welcome marketers to consider how interactive, cross platform press deals will add value to plans.

Please contact myself or another member of the Generation Media team for more information on other ABC reports.

Ellie.start@generationmedia.co.uk

0207 307 7900