Fisher-Price to 'step up efforts' against gender stereotyping after Little People play-set backlash

Robert Hutchins

By Robert Hutchins

October 27th 2016 at 11:22AM
UPDATED October 27th 2016 at 11:56AM
Fisher-Price to 'step up efforts' against gender stereotyping after Little People play-set backlash

The firm has responded to online upset at a toy depicting a mother figure in a pink car with the tagline 'time for yogurt and yoga'.

Mattel’s pre-school brand Fisher-Price has said it will ‘step up its efforts’ against gender stereotyping within its most popular toy lines.

The firm made the announcement in response to online backlash from consumers who took particular grievance towards a Little People pink toy car and mother figure with the tagline ‘time for yogurt and a smoothie.’

The toy was spotted in the aisles of Toys R Us in the US by Gina Zuk Gerber who took to Facebook to post her upset at the stereotyped depiction of women, stating that ‘women needed to be shown in leadership roles at work.’

The post was quick to pick up traction online, with others supporting Zuk Gerber’s stance on the toy’s depiction of motherhood.

According to reports Fisher-Price responded via Twitter, detailing that the company ‘could have done a better job’ and would focus on the issue in the future.

‘You’ve made us step back and see our product and package through a consumer’s eyes. We think you’re absolutely right, we could have done a better job,’ read a statement from the firm.

‘Our intention with this product and its package was to represent a moment in time many of today’s families could relate to, just an example of something a parent might do, but we understand how some see it as gender stereotyping.’

Recent years have seen Fisher-Price release play-sets featuring female fire fighters, dentists and farmers.

‘As parents and people who work for one of the most iconic child development brands, those are the kinds of playtime moments we want to be known for. Because time and again, we have seen that kids don’t make the assumptions adults tend to do.

‘You’ve inspired us to change the phrase the toy says, and also the words we call out on the package. We’re getting to work on that now.’