British startup OnBuy launches online marketplace to rival Amazon

Robert Hutchins

By Robert Hutchins

November 8th 2016 at 11:25AM
UPDATED November 8th 2016 at 2:46PM
British startup OnBuy launches online marketplace to rival Amazon

The platform is encouraging sellers to register with OnBuy as it sets out on its mission to ‘shake up online shopping’ as it offers products lines across every retail category.

British startup and marketplace OnBuy is looking to take on the likes of Amazon by offering zero selling fees and better margins to online sellers.

Launching today, the platform is encouraging sellers to register with OnBuy as it sets out on its mission to ‘shake up online shopping’ as it offers products lines across every retail category.

According to the marketplace’s managing director, Cas Paton: “OnBuy has arrived and we are ready to take on Amazon and other online marketplaces.

“For too long sellers have had a raw deal, with their profit margins squeezed by having to pay commission on every product they sell.

“OnBuy is different – there are no selling fees.”

Paton highlights that the aim of the marketplace is to work with sellers, ‘not against them or in competition with them,’ helping each trader to grow its business and customer base.

Subscription to the service will however cost £49 per month, which Paton cites as a “far better deal than on rival sites such as Amazon and eBay.”

Each member will also benefit from marketing support, kicking off I January and followed by a planned high-profile marketing campaign across online, print, TV, radio and social media.

The subscription model and subsequent cheaper costing for sellers to trade, means that vendors will be able to sell products at lower prices, passing savers on to customers.

‘OnBuy is a trading platform and not a retailer – it does not hold any inventory so unlike other major online retailers, it will never offer products in competition with its own sellers,’ read a statement from the firm.

“Our research tells us that customers and sellers don’t like some aspects of Amazon but so far they feel there has not been a credible alternative. Now there is one,” said Paton.