Big Potato teams with YouTube's Dan and Phil for new game, Truth Bombs

Robert Hutchins

By Robert Hutchins

October 19th 2017 at 6:00PM
UPDATED October 20th 2017 at 11:32AM
Big Potato teams with YouTube's Dan and Phil for new game, Truth Bombs

Truth Bombs is a controversial truth-telling party game in which players answer questions about one another anonymously.

YouTube stars Dan and Phil have teamed with the eggheads at Big Potato to release a new board game called Truth Bombs.

The partnership was formed when it emerged that the online influencers – boasting over six million YouTube subscribers – were big fans of Big Potato’s existing portfolio, including Bucket of Doom and Obama Llama.

“It was ace that they thought of us when looking for someone to work with on their new game,” Dean Tempest, co-founder of Big Potato told ToyNews.

“We knew that a funny, social, creative game from them would be an exciting project and just the sort of game we specialise in. The resulting collaboration is Truth Bombs. Fingers crossed that their fans, and ours, will love it.”

Truth Bombs is a controversial truth-telling party game in which players answer questions about one another anonymously.

Questions include: ‘If they release a fragrance, what would it be called?’ and ‘What did you think when you first met this person?’ as well as ‘What would they delete from their internet history?’

When everyone’s answer sheet have been completed, the truth-telling begins. One-by-one, each player reads aloud what the other player have answered about them on their sheet. Players get the chance to win points if they can match one answer to the author.

‘Prepare for gob-smacking revelations, fits of laughter and the occasional awkward moment,’ read a statement from Big Potato.

A game of Truth Bombs takes around 20 minutes to play and has a recommended age of 14 and over. The game is available now and is being stocked by both independent stores and major retailers.

Since starting their careers on YouTube, Dan and Phil have bridged the gap to mainstream recognition as a New York Times and Sunday Times best-selling authors, BBC Radio 1 DJs, TV presenters and festival headliners.